Category Archives: Legal Research Instruction

Letting 1Ls Leave the Nest

by Beau Steenken This week, I am teaching the final classes for this year’s 1L Legal Research. (At U.K., we teach nine classes spread out over the fall, and another six spread out over the spring, but we end early … Continue reading

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Alternative Group Work Activities

by Margaret Ambrose At the beginning of last semester, I asked my colleagues: “What is the ideal group size when having students work on problems in class?” I got several answers, all within the 3-5 range. Generally, the feedback centered … Continue reading

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Learning Theories and Law: Behaviorism, Cognitivism, Constructivism

by Ashley Ahlbrand As I noted in a previous post, I am currently pursuing a graduate certificate in instructional design. The course I am taking this semester is heavily theory-based, and thus we have spent a good portion of the … Continue reading

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Of Boardgames, Grading Rubrics, and Instructional Style

by Tig Wartluft I’m a gamer; my wife, not so much. I say this because I’ve spent years trying to find board games that she and I both enjoy playing equally. A couple of weeks ago I finally found one. … Continue reading

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On the Value of Student Conferences

by Beau Steenken Earlier this week I emerged from the annual occurrence that my wife refers to as “three weeks of hell every winter,” namely grading and student conferencing. I’ve posted before about how grading is not my favorite aspect … Continue reading

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On the Value of Teaching the Chemical Structure of Water

by Paul Gatz The American writer David Foster Wallace began his 2005 commencement address to the students of Kenyon College (published in 2009 as This Is Water) with a parable: There are these two young fish swimming along, and they happen to … Continue reading

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Bridging the Political Gap (or yawning chasm) in the Classroom

by Beau Steenken At the beginning of the semester last fall, I wrote about the increased difficulty of teaching in politically turbulent times. This may be somewhat of an understatement, but the level of division in our society has not … Continue reading

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