Cool Teaching Tools

I recently attended the Mid-America Association of Law Libraries (MAALL) Annual Meeting. As at most law library conferences these days, there was a program on cool technology tools that we could use in the office and classroom. Here are some that caught my attention this time around.

emaze

Move over Prezi — there is a new presentation program available. With emaze, you can seamlessly toggle back and forth between a multitude of media such as slides, videos, and in-class demonstrations. This is perfect for demonstrating your favorite online resource in your legal research course. When students go back to review your slides, they can also view recorded class content.

LibGuides

LibGuides are a library web publishing service offered through Springshare. This service provides its users with a platform for creating, managing, and publishing electronic research and resource guides. While this product may not be new to many, Springshare’s new LibGuides v2.0 may be! V2.0 offers more efficient searching, the LibAnswers widget, more user account restrictions, an improved line checker and tags, and other new features. Already have LibGuides v1.0? Good news! You will be able to migrate your v1 guides into v2. You can find out more about this process and more here: http://blog.springshare.com/2014/08/11/libguides-2-major-update/

i>clicker

What is i>clicker? It is a tool that allows instructors to interact with their students through a remote control. You can take attendance, take polls, quiz students, and facilitate discussion all through the click of a button. Instructors can also display the results instantaneously within their presentation. Students can also turn their smartphone or laptops into an i>clicker. This encourages students to become more involved in class without having to raise their hand.

Have you tried any of these cool tools in your classroom? Do you have any tips or feedback to share? Or do you know of other cool tools worth sharing? Let us know!

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